Dating a gibson sg standard

The domestic models had the Gibson open-book headstockdesign while the exported models were given the usual Epiphone design.The regular line as well as their "Elite" line of guitars were all made in the samefactories as the Orvilles and Orville by Gibsons.

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Gibson, these fully-authorized Japanese guitars came into existence through partnershipsbetween Gibson USA and various Japanese manufacturers and dealers (such as Aria, Matsumoku and Yamano Music) that extend back into the 1970s.Don't get me wrong, Orvilles are great guitars, and I found them all to be made much better than their USA counterparts, but they all lacked the unique feel andplayability that has earned Greco, Tokai and Aria Pro II their growing stellar reputations.And also, don't judge an Orville by whether it has "by Gibson" on theheadstock or not.While somewhat confusing, you can determine where your Orville or Orville by Gibson guitar was made, the year it was made, and even the month it was made,by looking at the back of the headstock.There were 5 different methods used to date Orville and Orville by Gibson guitars and two factories involved withbuilding them, so I've developed the simple chart below to assist you...*F = Factory: G, J & K beginning the serial numbers denote that is was made by the Terada factory: the "G" ink stamp means the guitar should have Gibson USA pickups, and "J" for Japanese pickups.

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